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Accueil > A propos du LPP > Communication > Actualités archivées > 2023 > Tarek Ben Slimane defended his PhD "Investigation of the Optical Emission of Hall Effect Thrusters using Collisional Radiative Models, PIC Simulations, and Machine Learning"

Tarek Ben Slimane defended his PhD "Investigation of the Optical Emission of Hall Effect Thrusters using Collisional Radiative Models, PIC Simulations, and Machine Learning"

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On December 19, 2023, Tarek Ben Slimane defended his PhD "Investigation of the Optical Emission of Hall Effect Thrusters using Collisional Radiative Models, PIC Simulations, and Machine Learning".

Abstract :
This work provides a multifaceted analysis of the optical emission of Hall Effect thrusters. It comes in the context of the growing New Space industry, marked with the increasing use of micro reusable launchers and ride-share satellite programs, hence reducing space operation costs. This shift has led to growing demand for standardized and miniaturized satellite equipment, with a particular focus on Hall thrusters due to their high thrust-to-power ratio, flexible specific impulse, and high efficiency. In this work, we build upon the previous development of the LPPic Particle-In-Cell code to explore plasma dynamics and interactions within the thruster by coupling the simulations with virtual diagnostics. First is collective Thomson scattering to explore the electron density fluctuations in the thruster. Second is optical emission spectroscopy coupled with a collisional radiative model to characterize the electron energy distribution function. Both diagnostics are instrumental in validating LPPic simulations, with the latter standing out as a promising tool for assessing the performance of the thruster in orbit.
This study established the importance of considering spatial gradients in the plume of the thruster when extracting plasma parameters from optical emission. It also highlighted the validity of the transport and Maxwellian assumptions in the collisional radiative models of neutral species. It highlighted line-specific bandwidth limitations for the implementation of optical emission spectroscopy to study high-frequency instabilities (≥ 1MHz). It also demonstrated the validity of the virtual diagnostic analysis and the adequacy of optical emission and collisional radiative models to monitor Hall Effect thrusters in orbit. Finally, an innovative enhancement to the optical emission and collisional radiative model was the integration of artificial neural networks, which significantly improved the efficiency and scope of the diagnostic, by speeding up the processing, reducing the needed hardware in orbit, and allowing the optical control of the operating parameters.

Jury :
Erik Johnson- Ecole polytechnique, President
Sedina Tsikata- Georgia Tech, Reviewer
Tsanko Tsankov- Ruhr University Bochum, Reviewer
Mark Capelli- Standford University, Examinator
Olivier Duchemin- Safran Group, Examinator
Victor D ́esangles- ONERA, Examinator
Pascal Chabert- Ecole polytechnique, Advisor
Anne Bourdon- Ecole polytechnique, Advisor

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Hébergeur : Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique route de Saclay F-91128 PALAISEAU CEDEX
Directeur de la publication : Anne Bourdon (Directrice)

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